OECD and Mexico: Financing adaptation to climate change

Source(s)
World Water Council
Photo by Peter Casier CC BY-NC 2.0 http://www.flickr.com/photos/kingbob86/5692546000
Photo by Peter Casier CC BY-NC 2.0 http://www.flickr.com/photos/kingbob86/5692546000

The National Water Commission of Mexico (CONAGUA) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) sign in Marseille a cooperation agreement including 38 project proposals to foster Mexico’s 2030 Water Agenda.

The agreement aims to implement benchmarks, information and activity exchanges to optimize the development of the water sector in Mexico. The effects of climate change to which Mexico is exposed include decreasing water availability and growing vulnerability toward risks of drought and flooding. The main sectors benefiting from the agreement comprise public urban use, industry and agriculture. The single chance of success lies in an efficient use of water, stresses José Luis Luege, General Director of CONAGUA.

“Water issues are critical for Green Growth,” OECD’s General-Secretary

The projects funded by OECD to support Mexico in achieving its 20-year water objectives (Mexico’s 2030 Water Agenda) deal with stopping basin, river and lake degradation; returning them into equilibrium and flooding issues. José Angel Gurría, OECD’s General-Secretary, underlined the crucial symbiosis between strong, clean and fair economic and water management processes. Addressing climate change, biodiversity, health and water issues are critical for Green Growth. Moreover, they are one of the most important inter-generational projects of our time.

In a festive atmosphere, full of applause and laughter, the cooperation agreement was signed by Luege and Gurría before participants of the 6th Water World Forum, Mexican and OECD officials, representatives, the Mexican ambassador to France, Carlos de Icaza.

The instrument denotes long-term political compromise beyond administrations and at all levels of the Mexican Government. It focuses on achieving management efficiency, governance and political reforms, and relies on water management projects fully embracing private sector initiatives, mainly through financing. It intends to foster consensus, development and solutions within Mexico, through a follow-up regulatory framework, sound expertise and best practices.

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