Saving the forests with indigenous knowledge

Source(s)
Inter Press Service International Association
by Flickr user  franz88 / Franz Dejon Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 2.0, http://www.flickr.com/photos/franz88/1257766237/
by Flickr user franz88 / Franz Dejon Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 2.0, http://www.flickr.com/photos/franz88/1257766237/

Olonana Ole Pulei is in Durban, South Africa, to represent the Laibon community, a sub-tribe of Kenya’s Maasai ethnic group, at the ongoing 17th Conference of Parties to show how indigenous knowledge is important in forestry conservation.

Representatives from different communities have gone to Durban like Olonana, so that their contributions to forest conservation are recognised as part of the climate change mitigation and adaptation efforts, reports IPS.

"We believe that African traditional ecological knowledge is the foundation for appropriate and effective national adaptation policies," said Nigel Crawhall, the Director of Secretariat for the Indigenous Peoples of Africa Co-ordinating Committee (IPACC).

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