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  • Trapped in the prison of the mind: Notions of climate-induced (im)mobility decision-making and wellbeing from an urban informal settlement in Bangladesh
    https://www.preventionweb.net/go/71376

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Trapped in the prison of the mind: Notions of climate-induced (im)mobility decision-making and wellbeing from an urban informal settlement in Bangladesh

Source(s):  Palgrave Macmillan

The concept of Trapped Populations has until date mainly referred to people ‘trapped’ in environmentally high-risk rural areas due to economic constraints. This article attempts to widen our understanding of the concept by investigating climate-induced socio-psychological immobility and its link to Internally Displaced People’s (IDPs) wellbeing in a slum of Dhaka.

The authors suggest that people reported facing non-economic losses due to the move, such as identity, honour, sense of belonging and mental health. These psychosocial processes help explain why some people ended up ‘trapped’ or immobile. The psychosocial constraints paralysed them mentally, as well as geographically.



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  • Trapped in the prison of the mind: Notions of climate-induced (im)mobility decision-making and wellbeing from an urban informal settlement in Bangladesh
  • Publication date 2020
  • Author(s) Ayeb-Karlsson, Sonja; Kniveton, Dominic; Cannon, Terry
  • Number of pages 15 p.

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