Document / Publication

  • Do more with your content!Discover PreventionWeb Services
  • Inserting rights and justice into urban resilience: a focus on everyday risk in cities in the South
    https://www.preventionweb.net/go/58352

    Email sent!

    An email has been sent to the email addresses provided, with a link to this content.

    Thank you for sharing!

    OK

Inserting rights and justice into urban resilience: a focus on everyday risk in cities in the South

Source(s):  Urban Africa Risk Knowledge (Urban ARK)

This briefing aims to reconceptualise resilience with more emphasis on rights and justice for urban citizens, and less focus on infrastructure as the object to be made resilient. A justice orientation draws on theories that consider justice to include: the fair distribution of social and material advantages; meaningful participation in decision-making processes; acknowledgement of social, cultural and political differences; and the right to minimum levels of capabilities and opportunities to achieve livelihood and well-being goals.

This briefing deliberately assumes a Southern perspective. The failings of everyday development are perhaps most real in the Global South, where urban inequality is high, and social and ecological resilience is threatened. The discussions here are informed by the lived realities and conceptual innovations of urban contexts. Key consideration is given to resilience, rights, entitlements and risk management in urban areas.



Add this content to your collection!

Enter an existing tag to add this content to one or more of your current collections. To start a new collection, enter a new tag below.

See My collections to name and share your collection
Back to search results to find more content to tag

Log in to add your tags
  • Inserting rights and justice into urban resilience: a focus on everyday risk in cities in the South
  • Publication date 2018
  • Number of pages 4 p.

Please note:Content is displayed as last posted by a PreventionWeb community member or editor. The views expressed therein are not necessarily those of UNISDR PreventionWeb, or its sponsors. See our terms of use