Urban Africa Risk Knowledge

Latest additions

2020

Using the widely-acknowledged four key roles that Local Governments (LGs) are expected to play as a reference and the Pressure and Release Model (PAR) as an exploratory framework; the paper examines the role of LGs in reducing disaster losses and

Urban Africa Risk Knowledge
2020

This publication covers a range of disaster risk management (DRM) themes, from community participation in DRM data collection to risk mapping and from urban waste management to hazard accumulation in urban risk traps. Both the causes for risk accumulation

United Nations Human Settlements Programme - Headquarters Urban Africa Risk Knowledge
2018

Cette recherche contribue à la littérature sur le risque de catastrophes, en approfondissant la compréhension de la relation entre la vulnérabilité aux inondations, l'urbanisme, et les stratégies d'adaptation locales. Ce travail présente une étude

Urban Africa Risk Knowledge
2018

Nairobi’s informal settlements typically face several risks such as low-quality shelter or infrastructure, fires linked to hazardous illicit electricity, flooding, crime, and unresponsive local governance. The briefing analyses three interlinked

Urban Africa Risk Knowledge
2018

Natural hazards (e.g. floods, fires) have the potential to occur at the same time or trigger other natural hazards. These multi-hazards potentially have a greater impact than the individual impacts from the individual hazards involved. Towns and cities

Urban Africa Risk Knowledge
2019

In African cities, orienting risk management towards a developmental agenda can confront the root causes of poverty and risk. Transition to an integrated approach has the highest chance of success when it combines interventions working on the risk culture

Urban Africa Risk Knowledge
2019

This briefing draws from the experience of the City Resilience Action Planning (CityRAP) Tool developed by UN-Habitat, including within the Urban Africa Risk Knowledge (Urban ARK) programme. The tool was implemented in 20 cities spread over nine countries

Urban Africa Risk Knowledge
2019

Many cities in sub-Saharan Africa lack official records of deaths and of serious illnesses and injuries from everyday hazards and disaster events at all scales. This is a major limitation to effective planning for risk reduction. This briefing describes

Urban Africa Risk Knowledge

Mission

Urban Africa: Risk Knowledge is a 3-year research and capacity building programme led by King’s College London. The work seeks to open up an applied research and policy agenda for risk management in urban sub-Saharan Africa.

The main objective is to reduce disaster risk in urban sub-Saharan Africa by breaking cycles of risk accumulation. This will be achieved by:

  • Building a community of practice including sub-Saharan, African and international researchers and practitioners that can provide a structured assessment of risk accumulation and reduction dynamics;
  • Developing a detailed understanding of underlying factors driving risk accumulation;
  • Fostering a deep understanding of risk to women, men and children in a diverse range of urban contexts in low-income countries in sub-Saharan Africa;
  • Understanding how the nature and scale of these risks are changing in the context of urban growth and change, poverty and climate change.

Research is focused in depth on four cities – each presenting different development and hazard contexts: Ibadan in Nigeria, Karonga in Malawi, Nairobi in Kenya and Niamey in Niger. We also work in Dakar, Senegal and Mombasa, Kenya. The cities offer broad regional coverage, a range of city population sizes and in-land and coastal locations. 

The work highlights urbanisation processes that generate human vulnerability and exposure to a whole spectrum of hazards. Focus is on those at risk, especially in low-income and often informal or illegal settlements, but also on large-scale planned urbanization projects and how these reshape the social and environmental geographies of cities and consequent risk profiles.

The organization has no registered commitments.

The Sendai Framework Voluntary Commitments (SFVC) online platform allows stakeholders to inform the public about their work on DRR. The SFVC online platform is a useful toolto know who is doing what and where for the implementation of the Sendai Framework, which could foster potential collaboration among stakeholders. All stakeholders (private sector, civil society organizations, academia, media, local governments, etc.) working on DRR can submit their commitments and report on their progress and deliverables.

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