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  • North Atlantic coast comprehensive study: resilient adaptation to increasing risk
    https://www.preventionweb.net/go/45822

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North Atlantic coast comprehensive study: resilient adaptation to increasing risk

Source(s):  United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE)

The goal of this study is to provide a risk management framework, consistent with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/USACE Infrastructure Systems Rebuilding Principles; and support resilient coastal communities and robust, sustainable coastal landscape systems, considering future sea level and climate change scenarios, to manage risk to vulnerable populations, property, ecosystems, and infrastructure.

This study provides a step-by-step approach, with advancements in the state of the science and tools to conduct three levels of analysis: a regional scale analysis, a watershed scale analysis and a local scale analysis that incorporates benefit-cost evaluations of coastal storm risk management plans.

This report can be used by States and local communities to identify their flood risk, and implement strategies in collaboration with others, to reduce that risk now and into the future. Such risk management can include non-structural and structural strategies, ranging from the wise use of floodplains and evacuation planning to natural and nature-based features (NNBF) and blended solutions.



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  • North Atlantic coast comprehensive study: resilient adaptation to increasing risk
  • Publication date 2015
  • Number of pages 140 p.

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