California WaterBlog

Academic & Scientific
United States of America

Latest additions

In brief, Risk Rating 2.0 moves the NFIP away from its heavy reliance on in-or-out flood zones, in particular in-or-out of the so-called “100-year floodplain,” and towards an individual assessment of risk for each property.
California WaterBlog
California had two droughts lasting 120-200 years, “megadroughts” by any standard. Could the state’s water resources continue to supply enough water to drink, grow crops and provide habitat for fish with such an extreme, prolonged drought today.
California WaterBlog
Will California state get wetter or drier in the future? Climate models disagree on this question, but provide insights on other important water management questions.
California WaterBlog
The drought degraded environmental conditions in the delta as the region became saltier and warmer, invasive weeds spread, and iconic fishes had strong declines.
California WaterBlog
First Street Foundation releases tool that can help people understand flood risk for an individual property, area, or region.
California WaterBlog
With the near-end of its wet season, California’s 2020 water year is and will be dry. Data places 2020 somewhere between 3% and 7% driest on record for this index.
California WaterBlog
Extreme precipitation is increasing with climate change, which creates a flood insurance dilemma for American states and residents living in at-risk areas.
California WaterBlog
A new report presents recommendations for integrating small, rural communities in the implementation of California's Sustainable Groundwater Management Act.
California WaterBlog

Mission

So what do a biologist, economist, engineer and geologist have in common? An interest in California’s most pressing water resource management problems. Scientists, faculty, students and researchers at UC Davis’ Center for Watershed Sciences collaborate across the UC Davis campus and with experts from other universities, research institutes, government agencies and NGOs.

Together they address critical issues affecting streams, rivers, lakes and estuarine ecosystems within California’s Central Valley, the Sierra Nevada and San Francisco Estuary. By working across disciplines, they are at the forefront of providing up-to-date scientific approaches to watershed science and policy to best meet the diverse demands placed on these resources.

This blog is intended to provide thought-provoking ideas and information on water issues in a digestible form for a policy and educated lay audience. We hope you find it useful, or at least interesting.

The organization has no registered commitments.

The Sendai Framework Voluntary Commitments (SFVC) online platform allows stakeholders to inform the public about their work on DRR. The SFVC online platform is a useful toolto know who is doing what and where for the implementation of the Sendai Framework, which could foster potential collaboration among stakeholders. All stakeholders (private sector, civil society organizations, academia, media, local governments, etc.) working on DRR can submit their commitments and report on their progress and deliverables.

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