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  • Adolescent girls in disaster & conflict: Interventions for improving access to sexual and reproductive health services
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Adolescent girls in disaster & conflict: Interventions for improving access to sexual and reproductive health services

Source(s):  United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA)

Millions of adolescent girls are in need of humanitarian assistance. A crisis heightens their vulnerability to gender-based violence, unwanted pregnancy, HIV infection, maternal death and disability, early and forced marriage, rape, trafficking, and sexual exploitation and abuse. In emergencies, adolescent girls need tailored programming to increase their access to sexual and reproductive health services, including family planning, and to protect them from gender-based violence.

From safe spaces to mobile clinics to youth participation, UNFPA uses different approaches to reach displaced, uprooted and crisis-affected adolescent girls at a critical time in their young lives. This publication features new case studies on reaching adolescent girls in humanitarian situations from programmes in Malawi, Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria, Pakistan, the Philippines and Somalia. 



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  • Adolescent girls in disaster & conflict: Interventions for improving access to sexual and reproductive health services
  • Publication date 2016
  • Number of pages 86 p.

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