Document / Publication

  • Do more with your content!Discover PreventionWeb Services
  • Six months since Western Japan floods: lessons from Mabi
    https://www.preventionweb.net/go/64372

    Email sent!

    An email has been sent to the email addresses provided, with a link to this content.

    Thank you for sharing!

    OK

Six months since Western Japan floods: lessons from Mabi

Source(s):  ACT Alliance (ACT)
Church World Service (CWS)

This report summarizes the key findings of research done through a literature survey and field visits to Mabi between November 2018 and January 2019, after CWS Japan responded to a flood event in the town. It aims to study and understand important lessons from this flood disaster, focusing on the ten most important issues.

The Western region of Japan saw successive heavy rainfalls from the end of June to mid July of 2018, causing devastating floods in many areas including Hiroshima, Okayama and Ehime. One of the most severely affected areas was a small town called Mabi in Okayama prefecture. The town stands on two rivers called Takahashi and Oda, both of which overflowed and flooded almost one-third of the area of the town. The embankments broke down at 8 places and the floodwater rose as high as 5 metres in many areas. About 4600 houses were affected and 51 people killed, most of whom were above 70 years of age.



Add this content to your collection!

Enter an existing tag to add this content to one or more of your current collections. To start a new collection, enter a new tag below.

See My collections to name and share your collection
Back to search results to find more content to tag

Log in to add your tags
  • Six months since Western Japan floods: lessons from Mabi
  • Publication date 2019
  • Author(s) Das, Sangita
  • Number of pages 16 p.

Please note:Content is displayed as last posted by a PreventionWeb community member or editor. The views expressed therein are not necessarily those of UNDRR PreventionWeb, or its sponsors. See our terms of use

CONTRIBUTED BY: A PreventionWeb user