Minimising further insect pests invasions in Africa

Source(s): Science and Development Network
Upload your content

By Esther Ngumbi

The US Agency for International Development (USAID) recently offered prize money for the best and digital tools that can be used to help combat the fall armyworm (FAW), an invasive pest that has spread across Africa. The winners will be announced in the coming months.

Identified in over 35 African countries since 2016, the FAW is expected to continue to spread, threatening food security and agricultural trade in African countries.

But this is not the first invasive pest the African continent is dealing with. Just a few years ago, African smallholder farmers battled the invasive South American tomato moth, Tuta absoluta. According to recent research, five invasive insect pests including T. absoluta cost the African continent US$ 1.1 billion every year.

Around the world, invasive pests are causing US$540 billion in economic losses to agriculture each year despite the fact that many countries are doing their best to prevent insect invasions now and into the future.

Tackling invasive pests reactively

To deal with invasive insects, African countries assisted by other stakeholders including aid agencies such as the USAID, research institutions such as the International Center for Insect Physiology and Ecology, the Center for Agriculture and Bioscience International (CABI, the parent organization of SciDev.Net) and the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (UN FAO) have repeatedly taken the reactive rather than a proactive approach in tackling the invasive pests only after they have established a foothold and caused considerable damage.

Ghana, for example, established a National Taskforce to control and manage FAW after the worms had invaded local fields. This taskforce mandate includes sensitising farmers and making them aware of the symptoms of armyworm attacks so they can report infestations to authorities and undertaking research aimed at finding short and long term solutions to combat the spread of FAW.

Malawi’s government prioritised the use of pesticides as an immediate and short-term strategy to fight the FAW after many of their smallholder farmers lost crops to this invasive insect. Further, the government intensified training and awareness campaigns about this pest and installed pheromone traps to help monitor the spread only after the pest had established a foothold.

The FAO, a leader in the efforts to deal with invasive pests in Africa, has spearheaded many efforts including bringing together experts from the Americas, Africa and other regions to share and update each other on FAW. The FAO has launched a mobile cell phone app to be used as an early warning system tool. But again, many of these efforts happened after the first detection of the FAW.

While many of these strategies are working, one cannot help but wonder what it would take for African governments to get ahead of this problem. How can aid agencies such as the USAID, UN FAO and other development partners that are currently spending billions to fight the invasive FAW help Africa to take the necessary steps to ensure that it is better prepared to deal with invasive insects now and into the future?

Anticipate and prepare

Recent research predicts that threat from invasive insects will continue to increase with African countries expected to be the most vulnerable. African governments must anticipate and prepare for such invasions using already available resources.

Early this year, CABI launched invasive species Horizon Scanning Tool (beta), a tool that allows countries to identify potential invasive species. This online and open source toolsupported by United States Department of Agriculture and the UK Department for International Development allows countries to generate a list of invasive species that are absent from their countries at the moment but present in ‘source areas’, which may be relevant because they are neighboring countries, linked by trade and transport routes, or sharing similar climates. Doing so could allow African countries to prepare action plans that can be quickly rolled out when potential invaders actually arrive.

Learn from other regions

Africa can learn from other regions that have comprehensive plans on dealing with invasive insects and countries that have gone through similar invasions.  The United States and Australia are examples of countries that have comprehensive plans on preventing and dealing with insect invasions, while Brazil has gone through its own FAW invasion.

Through workshops and training programmes that help bring experts together, African countries can learn how to prevent and deal with future insect invasions. Moreover, key actors including the USAID and the FAO should help organise more workshops and training programmes to that enable African experts to learn from their counterparts overseas. At the same time, the manuals, and all the information exchanged and learned during such workshops could be stored in online repositories that can be accessed by all African countries.   

Strengthen African pest surveillance

A recent USAID Feed the Future funded technical brief, which I helped to write, looked at the strength of existing African plant protection regulatory frameworks by examining eight indicators including the existence of a specified government agency mandated with the task of carrying out pest surveillance.

It reveals that many African countries have weak plant protection regulatory systems and that many governments do not carry out routine pest surveillance which involves the collection, recording , analysis, interpretation and timely dissemination of information about the presence, prevalence and distribution of pests.

The International Plant Protection Convention offers a comprehensive document that can help African countries to design pest surveillance programmes. Also, the convention offers other guiding documents that can be used by African countries to strengthen their plant protection frameworks. African countries can use this available documents to strengthen national and regional pest surveillance abilities.

Set up emergency funds

Invasive insects know no borders. Thus, African countries must work together. At the same time, given the rapid spread of invasive insect outbreaks, the African continent must set up an emergency fund that can easily be tapped when insects invade.  In dealing with the recent FAW invasion, it was evident that African countries and the continent did not have an emergency financing plan. This must change.

Explore further

Country and region Afghanistan
Share this

Please note: Content is displayed as last posted by a PreventionWeb community member or editor. The views expressed therein are not necessarily those of UNDRR, PreventionWeb, or its sponsors. See our terms of use

Is this page useful?

Yes No
Report an issue on this page

Thank you. If you have 2 minutes, we would benefit from additional feedback (link opens in a new window).