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  • Whence the next pandemic? The intersecting global geography of the animal-human interface, poor health systems and air transit centrality reveals conduits for high-impact spillover
    https://www.preventionweb.net/go/75038

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Whence the next pandemic? The intersecting global geography of the animal-human interface, poor health systems and air transit centrality reveals conduits for high-impact spillover

Source(s):  Elsevier
One Health

The health and economic impacts of infectious disease pandemics are catastrophic as most recently manifested by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The emerging infections that lead to substantive epidemics or pandemics are typically zoonoses that cross species boundaries at vulnerable points of animal-human interface. The sharing of space between wildlife and humans, and their domesticated animals, has dramatically increased in recent decades and is a key driver of pathogen spillover. Increasing animal-human interface has also occurred in concert with both increasing globalisation and failing health systems, resulting in a trifecta with dire implications for human and animal health. Nevertheless, to date we lack a geographical description of this trifecta that can be applied strategically to pandemic prevention. This investigation provides the first geographical quantification of the intersection of animal-human interfaces, poor human health system performance and global connectivity via the network of air travel. In so doing, this work provides a systematic, data-driven approach to classifying spillover hazard based on the distribution of animal-human interfaces while simultaneously identifying globally connected cities that are adjacent to these interfaces and which may facilitate global pathogen dissemination. We present this geography of high-impact spillover as a tool for developing targeted surveillance systems and improved health infrastructure in vulnerable areas that may present conduits for future pandemics.

Highlights

  • This work quantifies the global geography of wildlife-human interfaces.

  • A hierarchy of spillover risk is developed based on the nature of these interfaces.

  • 40% of the world's most connected cities are close to areas of impactful spillover.

  • This work identifies important conduits for potential future pandemics.

 



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  • Whence the next pandemic? The intersecting global geography of the animal-human interface, poor health systems and air transit centrality reveals conduits for high-impact spillover
  • Publication date 2020
  • Author(s) Walsh, Michael G.; Sawleshwarkar, Shailendra; Hossain, Shah; Mo, Siobhan M.
  • Number of pages 8 p.
  • ISBN/ISSN https://doi.org/10.1016/j.onehlt.2020.100177

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