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  • Co-designing climate services to integrate traditional ecological knowledge: a case study from Bali
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Co-designing climate services to integrate traditional ecological knowledge: a case study from Bali

Source(s):  World Bank, the (WB)

This brief underscores the importance of traditional ecological knowledge (TEK), and fills an important gap in understanding about the ways it can be integrated with conventional climate services to improve resilience and adaptation to climate change impacts.

The brief draws on insights from a case study that applied the Tandem framework, a collaborative approach for the co-design of climate services, in designing and implementing a climate field school programme for coffee and cacao farmers in Bali, Indonesia.The study mainly demonstrates that interactions between indigenous people, members of agricultural cooperative groups, those offering meteorological services (BMKG) and agricultural extension services

  • should not be a one-time activity conducted only at the start of the project.
  • Rather this identification effort should be part of a continuing iterative and facilitated process that evolves as insights lead participants to refine project direction and activities.

For more details on the results, please refer to the pages 9 to 11.



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  • Co-designing climate services to integrate traditional ecological knowledge: a case study from Bali
  • Publication date 2020
  • Author(s) Biskupska, Natalia ; Salamanca, Albert
  • Number of pages 14 p.

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