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  • Valuing the global mortality consequences of climate change accounting for adaptation costs and benefits
    https://www.preventionweb.net/go/59929

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Valuing the global mortality consequences of climate change accounting for adaptation costs and benefits

Source(s):  Rhodium Group, LLC
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley)
University of Chicago

This study provides the first comprehensive economic assessment of the lethal potential of climate change with a method that accounts for both the benefits and costs of adaptation. The researchers’ ultimate goal is to estimate the mortality consequences of climate change, both deaths caused by extreme heat and the costs society will pay to keep people out of harm’s way, in terms of dollars per ton of carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted.

This research aims to strengthen the empirical foundation of “partial” estimate for the social cost of carbon, one that focuses on estimates of climate-change induced mortality. It is “partial” precisely because it only measures the mortality impacts and misses the myriad other ways that climate change will impact well being. Doing so provides an approach that can be applied to other aspects of the global economy to provide a full and clear picture of how, why, and where the costs of climate change are likely to emerge in the future. 



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  • Valuing the global mortality consequences of climate change accounting for adaptation costs and benefits
  • Publication date 2018
  • Number of pages 4 p.

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