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  • The women of Katrina: how gender, race, and class matter in an American disaster
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The women of Katrina: how gender, race, and class matter in an American disaster

Source(s):  Vanderbilt University

This volume draws on original research and firsthand narratives from women in diverse economic, political, ethnic, and geographic contexts to portray pre-Katrina vulnerabilities, gender concerns in post-disaster housing and assistance, and women's collective struggles to recover from this catastrophe. It states that the transformative event known as "Katrina" exposed long-standing social inequalities. While debates rage about race and class relations in New Orleans and the Katrina diaspora, gender remains curiously absent from public discourse and scholarly analysis.



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  • The women of Katrina: how gender, race, and class matter in an American disaster
  • Publication date 2012
  • Author(s) David, Emmanuel; Enarson, Elaine (eds.)
  • Number of pages 272 p.
  • ISBN/ISSN 9780826517982

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