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  • Landslide susceptibility assessment of wildfire burnt areas through earth-observation techniques and a machine learning-based approach
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Landslide susceptibility assessment of wildfire burnt areas through earth-observation techniques and a machine learning-based approach

Source(s):  Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)
University of Sannio, Benevento (UNISANNIO)

Climate change has increased the likelihood of the occurrence of disasters like wildfires, floods, storms, and landslides worldwide in the last years. Weather conditions change continuously and rapidly, and wildfires are occurring repeatedly and diffusing with higher intensity. The burnt catchments are known, in many parts of the world, as one of the main sensitive areas to debris flows characterized by different trigger mechanisms (runoff-initiated and debris slide-initiated debris flow). The large number of studies produced in recent decades has shown how the response of a watershed to precipitation can be extremely variable, depending on several on-site conditions, as well as the characteristics of precipitation duration and intensity. Moreover, the availability of satellite data has significantly improved the ability to identify the areas affected by wildfires, and, even more importantly, to carry out post-fire assessment of burnt areas. Many difficulties have to be faced in attempting to assess landslide risk in burnt areas, which present a higher likelihood of occurrence; in densely populated neighbourhoods, human activities can be the cause of the origin of the fires. The latter is, in fact, one of the main operations used by man to remove vegetation along slopes in an attempt to claim new land for pastures or construction purposes. Regarding the study area, the Camaldoli and Agnano hill (Naples, Italy) fires seem to act as a predisposing factor, while the triggering factor is usually represented by precipitation. Eleven predisposing factors were chosen and estimated according to previous knowledge of the territory and a database consisting of 400 landslides was adopted. The present work aimed to expand the knowledge of the relationship existing between the triggering of landslides and burnt areas through the following phases: (1) Processing of the thematic maps of the burnt areas through band compositions of satellite images; and (2) landslide susceptibility assessment through the application of a new statistical approach (machine learning techniques). The analysis has the scope to support decision makers and local agencies in urban planning and safety monitoring of the environment



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  • Landslide susceptibility assessment of wildfire burnt areas through earth-observation techniques and a machine learning-based approach
  • Publication date 2020
  • Author(s) Napoli, Mariano Di; Marsiglia, Palmira; Martire, Diego Di; et al.
  • Number of pages 28 p.
  • ISBN/ISSN https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12152505

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