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  • Learning to Live in a Changing Climate: The Impact of Climate Change on Children in Bangladesh
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Learning to Live in a Changing Climate: The Impact of Climate Change on Children in Bangladesh

Source(s):  United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)

This report details the impact of climate change on children in Bangladesh. It begins with a review of the country's disaster profile with a discussion on the impacts of climate change. The impacts on children are presented with sections on education, health, nutrition, water sanitation and hygiene, child protection, and the cross-cutting themes of migration and urban slums. Case studies present community experiences from southern Bangladesh. 

The report includes key considerations for UNICEF Bangladesh, as well as implementation and sectoral recommendations. Findings show that the disaster-prone nature of Bangladesh is not currently reflected in programming. Instead ‘normal’ conditions are assumed, with disasters considered as separate and requiring ‘response’ activities rather than risk reduction and seasonal planning across all sectors. Climate change will start to reverse some of the progress made in key areas and programming changes are required to address highly vulnerable sub-populations.



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  • Learning to Live in a Changing Climate: The Impact of Climate Change on Children in Bangladesh
  • Publication date 2016
  • Author(s) Catherine Pettengell
  • Number of pages 89 p.

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