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  • Women and climate change: Impact and agency in human rights, security, and economic development
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Women and climate change: Impact and agency in human rights, security, and economic development

Source(s):  Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace and Security (GIWPS)

The report frames climate change as a universal human rights imperative, a global security threat, and a pervasive economic strain. Cataloging the effects of climate change, the study examines the gendered dimensions of sea level rising and flooding; deforestation and ocean acidification; water scarcity; energy production and energy poverty; and climate-related displacement and migration.

As part of this analysis, the report not only identifies how women are strained differentially and severely by the effects of climate change, but also how women have, continue to, and could serve as agents of mitigation and adaptation. For example, the section on water scarcity details how climate change causes droughts and soil erosion, which not only disenfranchises women farmers, who are the majority of the agricultural workforce in Africa and elsewhere, but also undermines hygiene and sanitation, affecting maternal health, women’s economic productivity, and girls’ education.



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  • Women and climate change: Impact and agency in human rights, security, and economic development
  • Publication date 2015
  • Author(s) Alam, Mayesha; Bhatia, Rukmani; Mawby, Briana
  • Number of pages 72 p.

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