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  • Climate change, conflict and security scan: analysis of current thinking August – November 2018
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Climate change, conflict and security scan: analysis of current thinking August – November 2018

Source(s):  Building Resilience and Adaptation to Climate Extremes and Disasters (BRACED)
Overseas Development Institute (ODI)

In the second instalment of ODI’s climate change, conflict and security scan, this report summarises the latest developments on Twitter, in the blogosphere, and in grey and academic literature to find new themes and emerging discourse on the intersection of climate and conflict risk.

A review of evidence across the quadrimester from August to November 2018, reveals a continuation of themes identified in the first scan, including:

  • Contributions to the theoretical framings used to understand the relationship between climate change and conflict
  • A continued emphasis on the national security implications of climate change for Western nations
  • Links to climate-related disasters and the politics of vulnerability

The report highlights new areas of focus, such as conflict risk associated with the transition to low carbon development and geoengineering, and finds concrete analysis being undertaken through climate-fragility risk assessments in the Lake Chad region.



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  • Climate change, conflict and security scan: analysis of current thinking August – November 2018
  • Publication date 2019
  • Author(s) Peters, Katie; Mayhew, Leigh; Measures, Hannah et al.
  • Number of pages 63 p.

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