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  • Public health and natural hazards: New policies and preparedness initiatives developed from an Australian bushfire case study
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Public health and natural hazards: New policies and preparedness initiatives developed from an Australian bushfire case study

Source(s):  Wiley

Public preparedness for natural hazard events is low. With worsening severe weather events due to climate change, public health policy and practices must evolve to more effectively engage communities. This study's findings identify and suggest new strategic public health policies in Australia to shift the practice of all‐hazards preparedness into routine, everyday life.

Three policies designed to improve human safety and well‐being are proposed and discussed. These are (i) a new system of workplace leave, (ii) an innovative regime of financial incentives for fire‐ready properties, and (iii) review of the use of firebreaks on farms and rural blocks.

Policies proposed in this research aim to proactively narrow the awareness‐preparedness gap and build adaptive capacity to minimise risk to human health in all‐hazards contexts. Further research could evaluate the efficacy of trialled public policy.



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  • Public health and natural hazards: New policies and preparedness initiatives developed from an Australian bushfire case study
  • Publication date 2019
  • Author(s) Westcott, Rachel; Ronan, Kevin; Bambrick, Hilary; Taylor, Melanie
  • Number of pages 6 p.

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