Seven years since Hurricane Sandy and southern Brooklyn is not prepared

Source(s)
Bklyner.

By Zainab Iqbal 

Hurricane Sandy slammed into Brooklyn in 2012. It caused 43 deaths and $19 billion in widespread devastation. Seven years later, the effects of the storm still linger. Though much work was done and promises were made, some weren’t kept and some weren’t enough.

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“We’re bolstering New York City’s defenses against climate threats with a bold and unprecedented $20 billion resiliency plan,” Bavishi [Director of the Mayor’s Office of Resiliency] said. “There is no quick fix for the risks we face, but the City’s efforts have already made New Yorkers safer and will continue to ensure that our neighborhoods, economy, and public services will be ready to withstand and emerge stronger from the impacts of climate change.”

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“Today marks seven years since Hurricane Sandy. As we discussed at my recent Climate and Resiliency Town Hall, though New York State now leads with groundbreaking climate legislation, we have a long way to go to ensure that we are prepared and resilient–especially in our coastal communities,” Gounardes told Bklyner. “We urgently need to address this, because we can’t afford the catastrophic damage that resulted from Sandy again.” [State Senator Andrew Gounardes]

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Council Member Mark Treyger, whose district was also severely impacted by the hurricane, detailed all the ways in which progress was made (in housing, infrastructure, hospitals, green space, schools, legislation, small businesses, workforce development, houses of worship, and resiliency) and the ways in which the city lacks preparedness.

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