You are in the STAGING environment

Document / Publication

  • Do more with your content!Discover PreventionWeb Services
  • Global Public Health Database Support to Population-Based Management of Pandemics and Global Public Health Crises, Part I: The Concept
    https://www.preventionweb.net/go/75456

    Email sent!

    An email has been sent to the email addresses provided, with a link to this content.

    Thank you for sharing!

    OK

Global Public Health Database Support to Population-Based Management of Pandemics and Global Public Health Crises, Part I: The Concept

Source(s):  Cambridge University Press

This two-part article examines the global public health (GPH) information system deficits emerging in the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The World Health Organization (WHO) convened a global forum on research and innovation for COVID-19 to identify immediate research actions, mid-term and long-term priorities, and cross-cutting research priorities. Biomedical priorities dominated the agenda, underscoring multi-sectoral knowledge gaps and challenges that must be addressed for pandemic health management.

The paper surveys past, missed opportunities for public health (PH) information system and operational improvements, examines current megatrend changes to information management, and describes a new multi-disciplinary model for population-based management (PBM) supported by a GPH Database applicable to pandemics and GPH crises.



Add this content to your collection!

Enter an existing tag to add this content to one or more of your current collections. To start a new collection, enter a new tag below.

See My collections to name and share your collection
Back to search results to find more content to tag

Log in to add your tags
  • Global Public Health Database Support to Population-Based Management of Pandemics and Global Public Health Crises, Part I: The Concept
  • Publication date 2020
  • Author(s) Burkle, Frederick M.; Bradt, David A.; Ryan, Benjamin J.
  • Number of pages 10 p.
  • ISBN/ISSN 10.1017/S1049023X20001351 (DOI)

Please note:Content is displayed as last posted by a PreventionWeb community member or editor. The views expressed therein are not necessarily those of UNDRR PreventionWeb, or its sponsors. See our terms of use

CONTRIBUTED BY: A PreventionWeb user