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  • The gendered nature of natural disasters: the impact of catastrophic events on the gender gap in life expectancy, 1981–2002
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The gendered nature of natural disasters: the impact of catastrophic events on the gender gap in life expectancy, 1981–2002

Source(s):  Annals of the Association of American Geographers (Taylor & Francis online)

Natural disasters do not affect people equally. In fact, a vulnerability approach to disasters would suggest that inequalities in exposure and sensitivity to risk as well as inequalities in access to resources, capabilities, and opportunities systematically disadvantage certain groups of people, rendering them more vulnerable to the impact of natural disasters.

This article analyses the effect of disaster strength and its interaction with the socio-economic status of women on the change in the gender gap in life expectancy in a sample of up to 141 countries over the period 1981 to 2002. The authors found that:

  • Natural disasters lower the life expectancy of women more than that of men. In other words, natural disasters (and their subsequent impact) on average kill more women than men or kill women at an earlier age than men. Since female life expectancy is generally higher than that of males, for most countries natural disasters narrow the gender gap in life expectancy.
  • Second, the stronger the disaster (as approximated by the number of people killed relative to population size), the stronger this effect on the gender gap in life expectancy. That is, major calamities lead to more severe impacts on female life expectancy (relative to that of males) than smaller disasters.
  • Third, the higher women’s socio-economic status, the weaker this effect on the gender gap in life expectancy. In other words, taken together our results show that it is the socially constructed gender-specific vulnerability of females built into everyday socio-economic patterns that lead to the relatively higher female disaster mortality rates compared to men.



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  • The gendered nature of natural disasters: the impact of catastrophic events on the gender gap in life expectancy, 1981–2002
  • Publication date 2007
  • Author(s) Neumayer, Eric; Plümper, Thomas
  • Number of pages pp. 551-566
  • ISBN/ISSN 10.1111/j.1467-8306.2007.00563.x (DOI)

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