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  • Trust and the communication of flood risks: comparing the roles of local governments, volunteers in emergency services, and neighbours
    https://www.preventionweb.net/go/72176

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Trust and the communication of flood risks: comparing the roles of local governments, volunteers in emergency services, and neighbours

Source(s):  Journal of Flood Risk Management (Wiley)

This study compares different levels of trust in local governments, volunteers in emergency and relief services, and neighbours, and how trust in these groups shapes citizens’ perceptions and actions relating to flood risks. Structural equation modelling is applied to a sample of 2007 flood‐prone households in Austria. A series of cognitive and behavioural responses to flood risks is regressed on trust shown to the three groups.

Among these three groups of trustees, the authors identify volunteers as specifically qualified to build awareness and communicate risks: Volunteers are the most trusted group and are perceived as more competent in the field of flood risk mitigation than the other two groups. Trust in volunteers increases risk perception and reduces the adoption of non‐protective responses such as denial and wishful thinking.



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  • Trust and the communication of flood risks: comparing the roles of local governments, volunteers in emergency services, and neighbours
  • Author(s) Seebauer, S.; Babcicky, P.
  • Number of pages pp. 305-316
  • ISBN/ISSN 10.1111/jfr3.12313 (DOI)

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