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  • Climate change, children and poverty: Engaging children and youth in policy debate and action
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Climate change, children and poverty: Engaging children and youth in policy debate and action

Source(s):  Comparative Research Programme on Poverty - Secretariat (CROP)

In this Poverty Brief published by the Comparative Research Programme on Poverty (CROP) at the University of Bergen, Norway, the authors argue that children and youth, particularly those living in poverty, must be empowered and supported to have their voices heard and to be part of the conversation in mitigation and adaptation planning and action to tackle climate risks.

The recommendations made by the authors are the following (pp. 2-3):

  • give children and youth a voice and a role;
  • build capacity among children and youth and educated them on climate change;
  • leverage adults while keeping the voice of children intact.

Poverty Brief, no. 32, June 2016. The CROP Poverty Briefs are a series of short research notes highlighting recent research and trends in global poverty.



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  • Climate change, children and poverty: Engaging children and youth in policy debate and action
  • Publication date 2016
  • Author(s) Mauger, B.; Minujin, A.; Cocco-Klein, S.
  • Number of pages 4 p.

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