Features

Two indigenous women work outdoors
Indigenous peoples’ understanding of disaster risk uses an enormous dataset – traditional knowledge and folklore reaching back many generations.
Concept of brain network
Why is it that individuals and governments still do not invest enough in disaster risk reduction (DRR), despite experience and evidence of its value?
Long lines at a grocery store following power outages and frigid temperatures in Texas, USA (2021)
Texas was facing a disaster – but the natural hazard was only the trigger. The failure of power grids is a technological consequence: one that can be measured, quantified and ultimately reduced.
SRSG in the Panama Canal
The Panama Canal is a living example of the importance of resilient infrastructure and good governance, two key factors in disaster risk reduction policies.
Group photo of PARTneR event in Samoa
New Zealand's The Pacific Risk Tool for Resilience (PARTneR) project aims to tailor a multi-hazard risk analysis tool to inform disaster risk management in Pacific Island countries, with pilots in Samoa and Vanuatu.
Wat Hong Thong located in a mangrove forest area , a temple on the sea , Bang Pakong District, Chachoengsao ,Thailand
Communities possess local experiences that allow them to adapt and respond to disasters. Knowledge exchange between the UK, Nepal and Thailand is helping researchers better understand and explore solutions to the risks facing these communities.
Kingdom of Tonga viewed from above
In times of disasters, persons with disabilities are the most vulnerable. With support from the United States, this is the narrative that the Kingdom of Tonga seeks to change.
Dhaka, Bangladesh: The Buriganga river is always busy with wooden boats and passenger ferries.
Bangladesh and the Netherlands are both situated in low-lying lands, making them prone to floods. As a result, both countries have found benefits in cooperation around flood control and water management.
Image of the disaster caused by typhoon Rolly and Ulysses in Catanduanes Bicol November 2020
Since 2013, a close partnership between humanitarian organizations and the government has been critical to strengthening the Philippines’s disaster risk reduction and management.
Street view of Coron, Philippines (2014)
More than 200 Filipino professionals have attended disaster management trainings in Japan, providing an opportunity to the Philippines’ Office of Civil Defense to learn from Japan’s experiences, technology and innovation.