Nature-based solutions for disaster risk reduction

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Working with nature and green infrastructure can improve the management of water resources and contribute to reducing risks associated with water-related disasters and climate change while restoring and protecting ecosystems.

Cover and title of publication
2021
This study quantifies the effects of hurricane windstorms on economic activity using nightlight as a proxy at the highest spatial resolution data available and accordingly, the broader socioeconomic and environmental effects of this protection.
World Bank, the
A new study that examined the plant diversity and carbon stock of 39-year-old human created forest shows that a mixed tree species plantation can be a viable nature-based solution to address flood and erosion impacts.
Mongabay
This image shows a bamboo forest
By slowing floodwater and stabilising riverbanks, bamboo walls could protect farmers from climate change-worsened floods – and earn them extra income
Thomson Reuters Foundation, trust.org
This is the first page of the paper.
2021
This study aims to present a methodology to improve the performance of hydrodynamic modeling by considering plant resistance with the goal of analyzing flood risk reduction strategies that support ecological conservation enhancement.
Journal of Flood Risk Management (Wiley)
Burnout of eucalyptus forest regrowth shows that there is life after the fire in the Australian bush with vibrant green shoots contrasting with black trunks and branches
The greatest solutions to a changing climate can be found in nature. As Hurricane Dorian hit the Bahamas, mangroves fringing the coastline were bending under the force of the waves, protecting the communities on shore.
World Bank, the
This is the front page of the publication.
2021
The report summarises evidence on the many ways in which Nature-based solutions (NbS) can address climate impacts in the UK, and explores the barriers and enabling factors that influence their wider uptake. 
Oxford University World Wide Fund For Nature Royal Society for the Protection of Birds