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  • Early lessons from the process to enhance understanding of loss and damage in Bangladesh
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Early lessons from the process to enhance understanding of loss and damage in Bangladesh

Source(s):  Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN)
DMC International Imaging Ltd (DMCii)
Germanwatch
International Centre for Climate Change and Development (ICCCAD)
United Nations University Institute for Environment and Human Security (UNU-EHS)

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This document is the result of an almost two-year engagement with the issue of loss and damage in Bangladesh. By providing an assessment of the first comprehensive process to better understand loss and damage at the national-level and presenting key research findings, it is intended to inform policy makers in other countries, who might be planning to undertake a similar process. To that end this summary for policy makers summarises the key messages of the document.

The document categorizes loss and damage as avoided (through mitigation and adaptation), unavoided (through inadequate mitigation and adaptation efforts) or unavoidable loss and damage from climate change impacts that cannot be adapted to such as sea level rise or ocean acidification. It must be noted that this document is based on research that is still in progress and there is still a lot that needs to be understood. In addition, we acknowledge that context matters and thus national research must be tailored to the individual needs of each country, taking into account not just the climate change impacts but the political situation and socioeconomic realities.



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  • Early lessons from the process to enhance understanding of loss and damage in Bangladesh
  • Publication date 2013
  • Author(s) Roberts, Erin; Huq, Saleemul; Hasemann, Anna; Roddick, Stephen
  • Number of pages 27 p.

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