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  • Perceived heat stress increases with population density in urban Philippines
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Perceived heat stress increases with population density in urban Philippines

Source(s):  IOP Science

In this study, the authors investigated how people in urban areas across the Philippines are affected by heat, using data from 1161 responses obtained through an online survey. The research found that almost all respondents (91%) are already experiencing heat stress quite severely and that the level of heat stress is correlated with population density. The authors found that those least likely to be severely affected by heat live in areas with fewer than∼7000 people per km2. Air-conditioning use at home relieved heat stress mostly for people in low-density areas but not where population density was high.

We conclude that the Philippines already faces substantial challenges because an increasing urban population is already severely heat stressed. The urban population appears to be coping poorly with heat, a problem that will be exacerbated by climate change. Public health interventions need to be directed at areas with the highest densities and where people of poor health live as well as those who cannot afford air-conditioning.



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  • Perceived heat stress increases with population density in urban Philippines
  • Publication date 2018
  • Author(s) Zander, Kerstin K; Cadag, Jake Rom; Escarcha, Jacquelyn et al.
  • Number of pages 8 p.

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