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  • A multi-hazards earth science perspective on the COVID-19 pandemic: The potential for concurrent and cascading crises
    https://www.preventionweb.net/go/71659

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A multi-hazards earth science perspective on the COVID-19 pandemic: The potential for concurrent and cascading crises

Source(s):  Environment Systems and Decisions

This article highlights the need for enacting COVID-19 countermeasures in advance of seasonal increases in natural hazards. The authors argue that the inclusion of natural hazard inputs into COVID-19 epidemiological models could enhance the evidence base for:

  • informing contemporary policy across diverse multi-hazard scenarios, defining and addressing gaps in disaster preparedness strategies and resourcing; and
  • implementing a future-planning-systems approach into contemporary COVID-19 mitigation strategies.

The recommendations provided are intended to assist governments and their advisors to develop risk reduction strategies for natural and cascading hazards during the COVID-19 pandemic:

  1. Make extensive use of pandemic and natural disaster hybrid models;
  2. Make extensive use of weather forecasting and seasonal prediction models;
  3. Re-design policy responses to different natural hazards;
  4. Support agencies working in developing regions to manage relief efforts.



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  • A multi-hazards earth science perspective on the COVID-19 pandemic: The potential for concurrent and cascading crises
  • Publication date 2020
  • Author(s) Quigley, Mark C.; Attanayake, Januka; King, Andrew et al.
  • Number of pages 32 p.
  • ISBN/ISSN 10.1002/essoar.10502915.2 (DOI)

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