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  • Knowledge, attitudes & practices study on climate change adaptation & mitigation in Guyana
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Knowledge, attitudes & practices study on climate change adaptation & mitigation in Guyana

Source(s):  United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)

This study summarises a Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices (KAP) Survey that addressed climate change awareness and education in Guyana.

In addressing sustainable climate change adaptation, mitigation and disaster risk programming it is vital that where there are significant gaps in knowledge, attitude and behavioral practices amongst Guyanese, measures on how to instill best practice and understanding must be highlighted. Hence, this study hopes to

  1. explore the Guyanese knowledge and perceptions of climate change;
  2. identify the ways in which Guyanese explain the causes of their changing weather, and the impact that such changes have on their lives;
  3. investigate the barriers to responding to climate change among individuals and communities and within local, provincial and national government;
  4. assess respondents’ media consumption patterns and preferences; and
  5. inform recommendations on the best methods of communicating to the Guyanese public on climate change.



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  • Knowledge, attitudes & practices study on climate change adaptation & mitigation in Guyana
  • Publication date 2016
  • Author(s) Hope, Stacy A.A.
  • Number of pages 80 p.

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