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  • Estimating populations affected by disasters: a review of methodological issues and research gaps
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Estimating populations affected by disasters: a review of methodological issues and research gaps

Source(s):  Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters (CRED)

This briefing note examines quality of disaster impact data with special attention to the estimation of disaster affected and its use for sustainable development progress monitoring. It draws on experience from the EM-DAT database to highlight options that balance soundness and rigour of methods and realities on the ground.

The note highlights the importance of measuring disaster impact with adequate indicators. It includes definitions and reviews some disaster impact data collection methods. It explains how small scale sentinel surveys for disaster impact indicators can be envisaged for priority countries. Such surveys could provide overall estimates but also generate data on disaster related rural-urban migration, effects on livelihoods and educational attainment. The report also notes the importance of nontraditional sources of data especially from remote regions, and the need to harness resources for data collection. It notes the high potential and possibilities of use of remote sensing and GIS technology in this context.



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  • Estimating populations affected by disasters: a review of methodological issues and research gaps
  • Publication date 2015
  • Author(s) Guha-Sapir, Debarati; Hoyois, Philippe
  • Number of pages 15 p.

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