Regional latest additions

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2021
This paper develops a Bayesian BWM and VIKOR-based model for assessing hospital preparedness in the face of disasters.
Natural Hazards (Springer)
As The Izmir Metropolitan Municipality, Department of Public Health, we design our works to protect and promote health, which is defined as “a complete physical, mental and social well-being state and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity”.
Izmir Metropolitan Municipality
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2021
This technical note provides a summary of the seismological and recorded ground characteristics of the 6.9-magnitude 2020 Samos-Izmir Earthquake earthquake together with the lessons learnt.
Natural Hazards (Springer)
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2021
This G20 Climate Risk Atlas factsheets sheds light on the risks faced by Turkey. The G20 Climate Risk Atlas is the contribution of the CMCC Foundation – Euro-Mediterranean Centre on Climate Change to ensure attentive and well-informed climate action
Centro Euro-Mediterraneo sui Cambiamenti Climatici
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2019
The aim of this study is to investigate different institutional frameworks that deals with the management of UNESCO World Heritage Sites (hereafter WHS) under the threats of natural and technological hazards in other countries in comparison with Turkey.
Resilience Journal
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2019
This chapter focuses on recent development and planning activities of settlements on hazard-prone areas across Turkey.
Springer
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2016
This paper aims to evaluate the main factors that contribute to the risk of flooding in riverine cities in Turkey, as well as to take some lessons for improving existing system.
METU Journal of the Faculty of Architecture
Eight people have been killed in the fires which have swept through Turkey's southwestern coastal regions, forcing the evacuation of tens of thousands of people
Thomson Reuters
25 November 2021
The Izmit Earthquake, also called Kocaeli Earthquake or Golcuk Earthquake, occurred on 17 August 1999. The magnitude 7.4 earthquake, which lasted less than a minute, struck the Anatolian fault system with the epicentre at about 7 miles southeast of Izmit. It caused the deaths of 17,000 people and left more than 250,000 people homeless. It was followed by the magnitude 7.2 Duzce Earthquake on 12 November 1999, which also occurred on the North Anatolian Fault and caused at least 845 deaths in Duzce and surrounding areas.
A report presented to the Parliament noted that giant waves can reach the shore in an hour and emergency plans are needed.
Daily Sabah