USA: Hurricane Sandy 2012

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In October 2012, Hurricane Sandy made landfall in Cuba and swept through the East Coast of the United States, causing critical destruction.

'The fear is that we'll get a meter of sea level rise by the end of the century, potentially more,' said Philip Orton, a physical oceanographer at the Stevens Institute of Technology. 'People are rightfully concerned. The New York City area isn't ready for the storm surges of today, as we learned from Sandy, let alone what is possible in the future'...
Inside Climate News
In the wake of Superstorm Sandy, which brought historic flooding to the greater New York area, Boston Mayor Thomas Menino called on city agencies, as well as landlords of low-lying properties, to assess what parts of city infrastructure, including its subway system, would be most at risk from flooding...
Thomson Reuters Foundation, trust.org
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'As part of the sorely-needed aid package to help victims of Hurricane Sandy, Congress is also considering spending billions on ill-advised and environmentally damaging beach and coastal rebuilding projects that ignore the looming threats of rising seas and intensifying storms,' according to Professor Rob Young of Yale University...
Yale University
© Munich Re http://www.munichre.com/en/media_relations/press_releases/2013/2013_01_03_press_release.aspx
Munich Re Board member Torsten Jeworrek: 'The heavy losses caused by weather-related natural catastrophes in the USA showed that greater loss-prevention efforts are needed. It would certainly be possible to protect conurbations like New York better from the effects of storm surges. Such action would make economic sense and insurers could also reflect the reduced exposure in their pricing'...
Münchener Rückversicherungs-Gesellschaft
US Senate Republicans are planning to cut $13 billion from the proposed post Hurricane Sandy reconstruction aid that would have been spent on infrastructure improvements to prepare for future storms, such as making the New York City subway tunnels flood proof or constructing sand barriers to protect some shorelines from storm surges...
Thomson Reuters Foundation, trust.org
Avant Sandy, nous pensions que New York était menacée par un ouragan tous les cent ans. Le grand défi de la durabilité était théorique. Maintenant nous savons qu'une catastrophe peut se produire chaque année", explique Rick Bell, directeur du centre d'architecture...
Le Monde
'The devastation wrought by superstorm Sandy is prompting renewed thinking about climate change and national security,' writes Lord Hunt of Delft University and former director-general of the UK Meteorological Office and Johnny Chan chair of the World Meteorological Organization’s Tropical Cyclone Panel...
Star, the - Toronto Star
by NYC Open Data; FEMA; FT research • Photos: NASA, Alamy • FT Graphic: Chris Campbell
'The next storm could hit next year or in 20 years. The real question for New Yorkers is, given that there will be another storm, what do they want it to look like? And if they don’t want it to look like Sandy, they are going to have to spend some money,' said hurricane expert Roger Pielke of the University of Colorado-Boulder...
Financial Times
The group of climate change advocates suggestions include new building codes, moving power lines below ground, wetland restoration, flood barriers, sea gates and the possible relocation of some coastal communities...
Guardian, the (UK)
CC BY 2.0 Paul Lowry http://www.flickr.com/photos/paul_lowry/8139029805
'The infrastructure of the nation is aging and it's at risk because, quite frankly, we're all not investing enough to take care of these facilities. And now we're facing extreme weather threats that cause us to need emergency response capabilities beyond what we've had in the past,' said Paula Hammond, head of the state's Department of Transportation...
CBS News, CBS Corporation