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Sarah Colenbrander, Researcher at the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED), International Institute for Environment and Development

A new report explores how cities can increase their resilience and resource efficiency – but highlights possible tensions between these two

Karlee Johnson, Research Associate at the Stockholm Environment Institute’s Asia Centre in Bangkok, Stockholm Environment Institute-Asia Centre

Asia-Pacific, the world’s most disaster-prone region, is home to an estimated 650 million people with disabilities. People with disabilities are four

David Satterthwaite, Senior Fellow at the International Institute for Environment and Development, International Institute for Environment and Development

Urban centres can be among the world's most healthy places to live and work – but many are among the least. How healthy they are is powerfully

David Satterthwaite, Senior Fellow at the International Institute for Environment and Development, International Institute for Environment and Development

For the billion urban dwellers living in informal settlements, there are many risks. Those who are more susceptible to these risks, or less able to

David Satterthwaite, Senior Fellow at the International Institute for Environment and Development, International Institute for Environment and Development

Whose lives are most at risk in urban areas of the global South – for instance from preventable diseases and disasters? And what are the most serious

Eliot Christian, Consultant on the Common Alerting Protocol (CAP), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

To help disseminate public warnings, alerting authorities have long relied on commercial media, such as newswires, broadcast radio and television

Ilan Kelman, Reader in Risk, Resilience and Global Health at University College London, England and Professor II at the University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway, University College London

Droughts are complicated, often more human-caused than precipitation-caused (Wilhite and Glantz, 1985). Nonetheless, precipitation and water certainly

Ilan Kelman, Reader in Risk, Resilience and Global Health at University College London, England and Professor II at the University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway, University College London

The media, and even scientific publications, continue to be packed with rhetoric that low-lying islands will sink, drown, or disappear due the seas

Ilan Kelman, Reader in Risk, Resilience and Global Health at University College London, England and Professor II at the University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway, University College London

After a disaster, we often hear about the need to bounce back, to return to normal, and to restore the pre-disaster state. How sensible is this?

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Ilan Kelman, Reader in Risk, Resilience and Global Health at University College London, England and Professor II at the University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway, University College London

We hear so much these days about climate change, often with suggestions of it inevitably causing more disasters. Science, however, paints a much more

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