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Atlases of natural hazards in the High Pamir and Pamir-Alai Mountains

Source(s):  Central-Asian Institute for Applied Geosciences
Global Environment Facility (GEF)
Kyrgyzstan - government
Tajikistan - government
United Nations Environment Programme - Headquarters (UNEP)
United Nations University Institute for Environment and Human Security (UNU-EHS)

The atlases provide hazard maps indicating different degrees of risks from earthquakes, avalanches, landslides, mud flows and floods in the High-Pamir and Pamir-Alai mountains of Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan. The set includes one regional atlas and two national atlases covering in more detail selected administrative districts and sub-districts in Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan. The atlases were developed by the Central Asian Institute of Applied Geosciences (CAIAG) in Kyrgyzstan in the framework of a project on Sustainable Land Management in the High Pamir and Pamir-Alai Mountains (PALM).

PALM is an initiative of the Governments of Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan that aims at addressing the inter-linked problems of poverty and land degradation in the High Pamir and Pamir-Alai mountains in the two countries. The project is executed by the Committee on Environment Protection under the Government of Tajikistan and the National Center for Mountain Regions Development in Kyrgyzstan with financial support from the Global Environment Facility (GEF). The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) is the GEF Implementing Agency for the project, and the United Nations University (UNU) is the International Executing Agency.



 
 
  • Atlases of natural hazards in the High Pamir and Pamir-Alai Mountains
  • Publication date 2010
  • Number of pages 69 p.

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