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  • Federal actions for a climate resilient nation: progress report of the Interagency Climate Change Adaptation Task Force
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Federal actions for a climate resilient nation: progress report of the Interagency Climate Change Adaptation Task Force

Source(s):  United States of America - government

This report provides an update in five key adaptation areas that align with the policy goals set forth by the US Interagency Climate Change Adaptation Task Force in 2010: i. Integrating adaptation into federal government planning and activities; ii. Building resilience to climate change in communities; iii. Improving accessibility and coordination of science for decision making; iv. Developing strategies to safeguard natural resources in a changing climate; v. Enhancing efforts to lead and support international adaptation. It uses examples to demonstrate there are management strategies at all levels of government and in all sectors that can help communities and businesses adapt to climate variability and change.

Executive Order 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental and Energy Performance, signed by President Obama in October 2009, charged the Task Force with providing recommendations on how Federal policies, programs, and planning efforts can better prepare the United States for climate change. In October 2010, the Task Force recommended a set of policy goals and actions in its Progress Report to the President. The Task Force outlined how the Federal Government should work with local, state, and tribal partners to provide leadership, coordination, science, and services to address climate risks to the Nation as well as Federal assets and operations.



 
 
  • Federal actions for a climate resilient nation: progress report of the Interagency Climate Change Adaptation Task Force
  • Publication date 2011
  • Number of pages 25 p.

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